The Providence Granola Project – Breakfast for People Who Give a Damn

Goodlifer: The Providence Granola Project

If you were around in the 60s and 70s, you knew about granola, because it was inescapable. Everybody and his brother made granola back then, and, like many other foods favored by hippies, it was related to a “back to the land” philosophy, one which came to be scorned during subsequent decades. But then something funny occurred; people decided that caring about the land and what you ate wasn’t such a bad thing after all.

And once again, everybody and his brother are producing granola. But don’t think that all granola is the same, because I can assure you it is not. Have you tried anything from The Providence Granola Project? If you haven’t, I think you’re missing out.

The Providence Granola Project was founded by two friends over a couple of beers one night, wondering what they could do to help refugees recently arrived in the U.S.

The Providence Granola Project was founded by two friends over a couple of beers one night, wondering what they could do to help refugees recently arrived in the U.S.

I like this business for a lot of reasons. It was founded, quite literally, by a couple of friends over a couple of beers one night, wondering what they could do to help refugees recently arrived in the U.S. ‘Make granola,’ was the somewhat unlikely answer Geoff Gordon and Keith Cooper, the co-founders of Providence Granola Project, came up with. Gordon and Cooper are highly creative individuals. Sure, they’ve always got their original formulation (Originola) available, but you’ll also find ever-changing flavors like Maple Rosemary, Pistachio Cardamom, and Bananas Foster. The people involved produce some very tasty granola (and muesli).

In addition to the original flavor (Originola), you’ll also find ever-changing flavors like Peanutty Goodness, Caramel Apple Corn and Maple Rosemary.

In addition to the original flavor (Originola), you’ll also find ever-changing flavors like Peanutty Goodness, Caramel Apple Corn and Maple Rosemary.

And, to the never-ending credit of the founders, there’s genuine thought behind their products and their business. In a country notorious for talking points and buzzwords and spin, in an era of short attention spans, these folks really think about what they do and what they make. The Providence Granola Project isn’t some advertising executive’s big-budget, lowest-common-denominator pitch to make you think you’re eating something healthy. This is cereal for people who give a damn about what they eat and understand that even a small purchase can have a direct impact on a community.

Goodlifer: The Providence Granola Project

Goodlifer: The Providence Granola Project

Photos from co-founders Geoff Gordon and Keith Cooper's personal album.

Photos from co-founders Geoff Gordon and Keith Cooper’s personal album.

The granola and muesli from The Providence Granola Project contain mostly organic ingredients. You’ll be able to pronounce the names of these ingredients, and you’ll know what all of them are. If you’re a true granola-lover, you can sign up for their Granola of the Month Club (or sign up someone else for a truly distinctive gift). If nothing else, take a few minutes to read about this business on the website; I guarantee it’s going to be a lot more eye-opening than any posts awaiting you on your social network of choice. Better still, try a bag of their granola and/or muesli, and see what you think.

One of the refugees employed by The Providence Granola Projects chats with a customer at the Farmer's Market.

One of the refugees employed by The Providence Granola Projects chats with a customer at the Farmer’s Market.

providencegranola.com

About author
Stephanie Zonis was born with a spoon in her mouth — a tasting spoon, that is. She began cooking (especially baking) at a very early age, and for a short time even ran a highly illegal baking business from her long-suffering parents’ house when she was in high school. After acquiring a Master’s Degree in Foods, she eventually discovered the Internet in 1997. She’s been writing about food and developing recipes, especially where chocolate is involved, ever since. During those few moments when she’s not cooking or writing or thinking about food, Stephanie enjoys reading, walking, political discussions, and volunteering at a local no-kill cat sanctuary. She has been a member of a medieval re-creation group for longer than she’ll admit and loves absurdist humor.
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